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The Compass  /  Style  /  Decoding the Dress Code : Business Casual Pt. 2 – The Boss Man

Decoding the Dress Code : Business Casual Pt. 2 – The Boss Man

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The Business Casual Boss Man

When you’re running the show, the dress code is less something to be followed as it is something to be created. If the buttoned up suit look isn’t right for you but neither is the slacker CEO look from the Zuckerberg school of style, business casual is the way to go. Define your style and the rest will take their cues from you. Here’s how to set the tone.

Knickerbocker Blue with Burgundy Windowpane Custom Unsuit with Blue & Orange Check Broadcloth Custom Dress Shirt

Nothing says “boss man” like fabric that is sourced from the underbellies of Himalayan goats. Cashmere is that fabric and it’s the hint of cashmere that is blended into this jacket’s wool that takes it from run of the mill to the dopest fabric to come out of the mill. When you combine the blazer with a classic pair of light gray slacks, as we did in this Unsuit, this outfit conveys both class and timeless style. When you add in casual details like patch pockets, this keeps you looking approachable while stylish.

Knickerbocker Blue with Burgundy Windowpane Custom Unsuit by Black Lapel, $599
Blue & Orange Check Broadcloth Custom Dress Shirt by Black Lapel, $99
Maroon Silk Knit Tie by Black Lapel, $59
Solid White Pocket Square by Black Lapel, $39

Knickerbocker Blue with Burgundy Windowpane Custom Blazer with Light Blue Gingham Broadcloth Custom Dress Shirt

The blazer says you’re not to be trifled with, but it doesn’t mean you take yourself too seriously. Check out the calming effect this gingham shirt has on the whole outfit, or the cheer these wine red chinos bring to the mix. Oh, and did you notice how the red in the pants brings out the windowpane pattern in the jacket? Other people will notice too, and they will shake their heads as they walk past you in the hall and say “damn, that dude’s got style.” And they will be correct.

Knickerbocker Blue with Burgundy Windowpane Custom Blazer by Black Lapel, $499
Light Blue Gingham Broadcloth Custom Dress Shirt by Black Lapel, $109
Vintage Cabernet Broken-In Chinos by J.Crew, $49.99

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4 thoughts on “Decoding the Dress Code : Business Casual Pt. 2 – The Boss Man”

  1. John Chrome says:

    …..But Black Lapel, the first jacket is a notched collar with no lapel buttonhole and the second definitely has red tinted horn buttons, peaked lapels and a matched colour stitched lapel buttonhole. I think Rafid Rabie is perfectly in the right to question this as they are two different jackets. As you know, being a suiting company, lapel style, colours and fit make a huge difference to a look and should not be dismissed so rapidly.
    I seriously doubt that the lighting has made this effect…

  2. The first picture of the Knickerboxer jacket has different buttons (brown/black vs red). The article implies you can are using the same jacket for both. This is incorrect.

    1. Black Lapel says:

      Both photos are of the Knickerbocker blazer, Rafid. The buttons are brown horn buttons in both photos. Since our buttons are made from real horns (not plastic), no two are exactly the same. That, plus changes in lighting can make them appear different but that’s just the nature of working with natural products to make our buttons.

  3. Black Lapel says:

    So if we read it correctly, you are saying that the jackets above are not the exact same. You are correct, the above photos are not photos of the same exact jacket. As we said to Rafid, though, they are both wearing Knickerbocker Windowpane blazers.

    How could this be, when there are differences in the lapels? We can see how this might be confusing, if you’re used to off-the-rack clothing that is designed with the take-it-or-leave-it approach and the wearer gets no choices about how it fits or how it is designed. Black Lapel is a custom clothing company, though (and also the publisher of The Compass). That means that each jacket we make is made to the precise measurements of the owner and things like lapel type are customized by the owner. In this case, as we said to Rafid, both photos are of the Knickerbocker blazer but the customizations are different in the photos.

    But enough about our business model, any thoughts on how the outfits look?

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